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Introduction

Use the Grove OLED and Barometer modules to create your own wireless weather station!

  1. In this project, we'll be using the BMP280, which is a small barometer which can read out the current air pressure as well as the temperature.
    • In this project, we'll be using the BMP280, which is a small barometer which can read out the current air pressure as well as the temperature.

    • In weather, air pressure is super useful to know as it can predict a variety of weather phenomenon like big storms!

    • If you're curious (and brave!) this is the full datasheet for the BMP280. It's very technical, but don't worry, we've done the work for you!

  2. In the MakeCode editor, click the settings icon and select "Extensions". Search for "BMP280" - the name of the barometer module, and click the highlighted extension. You'll know it's worked if you see a new barometer section on the sidebar!
    • In the MakeCode editor, click the settings icon and select "Extensions".

    • Search for "BMP280" - the name of the barometer module, and click the highlighted extension.

    • You'll know it's worked if you see a new barometer section on the sidebar!

    • We need this extension to interact with the BMP280!

  3. We'll be using the micro:bit's internal radio to communicate between the station and the receiver, hence the radio namespace.
    • We'll be using the micro:bit's internal radio to communicate between the station and the receiver, hence the radio namespace.

    • Make sure the radio's group is set to 1 and that the barometer is initialised! If you forget either of these lines your transmitter may not work!

    • The code here simply sends the current temperature and pressure over the radio to our receiver. We use the sendValue function to associate each value with its appropriate measurement.

    • We've used the BMP280's internal thermometer, however you could use the micro:bit's thermometer as well.

    • Take the micro:bit board off of the mounting frame.

    • Attach the barometer module to the header labelled "I2C P19"

    • It's important we use the "I2C" header, as this allows us to use a more complex communication method with the barometer module. If we used another header, we wouldn't get any feedback at all!

  4. Now that our transmitter is built, we need to make our receiver!
    • Now that our transmitter is built, we need to make our receiver!

    • We'll be using an OLED screen to display the readings from our station. It's a low power display which can also be found in high-end phones and televisions!

    • Create a new project, and this time search for "OLED" in the search box. Install the oled-ssd1306 extension.

  5. The code here is a little more complex. First we initialise the radio and OLED screen and define two variables to hold the current readings.
    • The code here is a little more complex. First we initialise the radio and OLED screen and define two variables to hold the current readings.

    • Next we write code to handle the incoming data to the micro:bit. If the value is a temperature reading we write it to temp, and pressure if it's a pressure reading.

    • Finally we display the readings on our screen and update the display every second.

    • Like before, attach the OLED module to the I2C header on the second micro:bit.

    • Put your weather station outside and turn it on.

    • Now turn on your receiver. You should see the screen displaying the current outside temperature and pressure!

    • Paul, the person who wrote this guide, is American, and therefore unable to understand Celsius! Can you add a row below the temperature reading that shows the current temperature in Farhenheit?

    • The formula to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit is temp * 1.8 + 32.

Finish Line

Paul Clavier

Member since: 06/11/2018

7 Guides authored

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